Park-and-Cube_Farfetch-MySwear_001s

Six to
Eight
art direction & photography SHINI PARK in collaboration with FARFETCH

Park-and-Cube_Farfetch-MySwear_002

Park-and-Cube_Farfetch-MySwear_003

How anyone in this expedited-delivery-obsessed century opts to wait 6-8 weeks for anything is a baffling yet fascinating notion. Patience is a ‘retro’ concept and kids scoff at the very thought. Heck, don’t we know our way around the IKEA warehouse like the back of our hands and are on first-name basis with the next-day couriers? How many times has the UPS delivery man made our blood boil by playing ding-dong-ditch with a yellow ‘We Missed You’ slip? Ergo, anything that takes 6-8 weeks to produce and deliver is 1) a long-term commitment involving a completely different mindset 2) a bloody tease, 3) from a dragon egg.

Perhaps it’s prescribing to the same ideas as stumbling upon a £10 note in the back-pocked of a pair of long-neglected jeans and feeling like you’ve earned some new cash, fair-and-square. Or signing for a parcel from US/Australasia, the one you ordered half-drunk a week back, and feeling rather as you’ve received a surprise gift. The one you bought with your own money.

Customized Trainers – MySwear via Farfetch

Park-and-Cube_Farfetch-MySwear_004

Park-and-Cube_Farfetch-MySwear_005aPark-and-Cube_Farfetch-MySwear_005

Park-and-Cube_Farfetch-MySwear_006Park-and-Cube_Farfetch-MySwear_006b

Six weeks is how long it took for this MySwear beauty to be produced, and it did not disappoint. I’d spent just about the same amount of time swirling the virtual shoe around and around (and around), deciding on colour and texture like my life depended on it (of course, then ending up choosing the most basic colours, because sense). And all I can think is that for six weeks they planted the little MySwear seed, watered it, and fed it some corn until ripe. Week of Christmas, it arrived in its wooden-boxed, woollen-dustbagged, customized glory – and of course it felt like a gift by then.

Now I just wish they have a dissertation option so that when I time-travel back to 2010 I can just feed it ‘Cream suede, white sole, ivory laces’ and wait 6-8 weeks for good results.

Park-and-Cube_Farfetch-MySwear_007

Sweater, trousers – Charlie May. Shirt – Junya Watanabe. Sneakers – Coach.

Park-and-Cube_Farfetch-Minimal_001

Triangle hoop Earring
By Boe
Choker
Miansai
Bustier Top
Fleur du Mal
Cropped Trousers
Y’s
Crinkled skirt
Junya Watanabe
Corduroy Wrap Skirt
Maison Margiela
Customizeable Sneakers
MySwears
Shirt – Junya Watanabe. Skirt – ASOS.

Park-and-Cube_Farfetch-Minimal_007Park-and-Cube_Farfetch-Minimal_002

Tuck into a wrap-skirt and belt off (and belt out, in Disney songs)

Park-and-Cube_Farfetch-Minimal_008

While I like to assign elaborate stories of acquisition to each piece that I add to the closet – be it temporarily (samples) or permanently (splurges) – I have a creeping suspicion there was a rather simple – if not primitive – reason to why I made a beeline to this Junya Watanabe crinkle shirt from Farfetch. Perhaps it was familiarity: hey you look like all my shirts in my closet, in fact hey you look like EVERYTHING in my closet (Iron? What’s that?) But really, I think it was a gut-reaction, an empathetic response of some sort, a bit like how one does to a wounded animal. This shirt looks EXACTLY like my current deadline situation, and I wanted to take care of it, even if just for a few nights. So here, three ways to wear it, because SENSE.
In collaboration with Farfetch

Park-and-Cube_Farfetch-Minimal_006

Coat – Rochas. Shirt – Junya Watanabe. Choker – By Boe. Bustier – ASOS. Trousers – Y’s.
Pair with a tight-fitting bustier and re-enact the scene from The Pirates of the Carribbean to get attention.

Park-and-Cube_Farfetch-Minimal_003Park-and-Cube_Farfetch-Minimal_004

Layer under a sweater and casually scrunch up the sleeves to show the crinkle madness underneath that cutely describes your current situation with deadlines.

Park-and-Cube_Farfetch-Minimal_005

Park-and-Cube_Farfetch-Oliver-Twist_001

art direction SHINI PARK photography & styling TEAM PARK & CUBE in collaboration with Farfetch

From Top to bottom: Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street (2004), Oliver Twist (2005), Inglorious Basterds (2009)

Cashmere turtleneck
Etro
Scarf
Isabel Marant
Ring
Kelly Wearstler
Runwell 41mm Watch
Shinola
Glasses
Masunaga
‘Fedora’ bag
Chloé
Coat
Harris Wharf London

Park8Park-and-Cube_Farfetch-Oliver-Twist_011

What can I say, ‘Please sir, can I have some more’ is my catchphrase and battle cry in any life situation. Most heavily used, of course, when involving cheese fries or Tom Hiddleston videos on Youtube. I’ve always wanted to shoot a story inspired by some of the best-known underdogs of literature and cinema, namely Oliver Twist and Shoshanna Dreyfuss of Inglorious Basterds, not only for their ballsy personalities but the costumes – granted, Shoshanna is only complete with actress Melanie Laurent’s gait and pout. The 1840’s fashion is as rigid as uniform-ridden 1940’s, but the characters wear simplified, improvised versions of trends of the respective eras: layered jackets instead of a Victorian 3-piece suit, or a worker’s shirt with woollen culottes instead of a button-down dress. Alas, here’s my interpretation, with current-season pieces from Farfetch and an ever-so-slightly more ballsy attitude to go with it.
Chelsea boots
Alberto Fasciano
‘Andre’ hat
Maison Michel
Cropped trousers
Y’s
Braces
KTZ

Park9

Park10

Watch – Shinola. Wool shirt – Citizens of Humanity. Shirt – ASOS.

Park-and-Cube_Farfetch-Oliver-Twist_002Park-and-Cube_Farfetch-Oliver-Twist_003

Blazer & Shirt – Charlie May. Skirt – Rochas. Trousers – Filippa K. Shoes – Dear Frances. Shoes – Chloe ‘Fedora’

Park-and-Cube_Farfetch-Oliver-Twist_004

ABOVE: Wool shirt – Citizens of Humanity. Trousers – Etro.
LEFT: Coat – Harris Wharf London. Turtleneck – Etro. Trousers – Rodebjer. Bag – Chloé

Park-and-Cube_Farfetch-Oliver-Twist_005Park-and-Cube_Farfetch-Oliver-Twist_006

Park-and-Cube_Farfetch-Oliver-Twist_007

Favourites from START London

Start London (Part of FarFetch boutique network), 42-44 Rivington Street, City of London EC2A 3BN

Right, I will now embark on a mini quest with the objective of sussing out cool shops/boutiques in London; if I can’t get my rear lumps to a gym this Olympics of a year then I might as well power-jog (or bus it, whatever) to places where I can actively practice the art of wallet-ry restraint and tone my forearm with the beast that bears the name of Canon.

Where else than START London to commence on such majestic quest? On my pre-Christmas visit I buckled for this little Charles Anastase polkadot number and decided it wouldn’t hurt to try it on, for what good is restraint when there is no direct challenge, non? I stepped out onto the dressing room landing to scrutinize myself in the mirror – the too-tight sleeves embossing polkadot craters on my arms (think it was two sizes smaller, come to think of it) –  clearly not a pretty sight as the shop advisers all scurried away to attend to a very un-straight shoes-display. As I was twirling, drunk with denial, the mirror suddenly wedged open and Mr Philip Start clambered out from what apparently was a stock room, and for a second I saw myself as a dapper man in an especially well-tailored suit (helloMr Start) and peed a little. Guess that was my own special inaugural starter pistol for the quest, so to speak.