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DIY floral laces: Fasten your shoes, Spring is a-coming!

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What you’ll need
Lace-up shoes of any sort – sandals, trainers, ankle boots; patterned bias binding (mine’s from Liberty) OR a long scrap floral fabric (re-purpose an old scarf/PJs or buy new from Liberty) OR classic ribbons, hair pin, scissors

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Pull out and the original laces from shoes

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Use the laces to measure out the right length from the new fabric.

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Cut 1.5inches (or 4cm) wide, and then cut again lengthwise in half – voilà, you have a pair of laces.

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Using a hairpin (thinner the better!), slip through a small section of the end and use that to guide the laces through the eyelets.

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Weave in the laces zig-zag as you would normally do – with some shoes you’ll find that lacing while wearing them on your feet will make the task easier.

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Et voila! And more ideas…

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Black heels – Zara. Red heels – Kurt Geiger Magdalena. Fabric & bias binding – Liberty. Photographer: ASSHOLE TRIPOD.

This is an age-old trick in the book but since 1) we’re all in a rut of some sort and 2) it’s clear that Spring is using Apple iOS6 Maps to find Europe and will probably take a cab from Africa around June I thought it might be fun to distract ourselves otherwise. If you’re like me, you’ll remember the joy of yanking out dirty laces from your trainers for a pair of spankin’ clean ones to realize you didn’t actually know how to lace them back in.  Once I got my head around it (at an embarrassing age, I think it was), no strip-looking thing in the house was to survive without having gone through some dirty eyelets on my Adidas originals: broken earphones, retired necklaces, some twines that may or may not have held the mackerel in the kitchen, ethernet cable (back when I knew not the value of being connected to the wall)… let’s just say I’m glad I met my husband in highschool because otherwise I’d now be captain of Weirdo-train until 35.

A few tips:

  • For sandals narrower strips (with edges fraying) tend to look better, while for trainers, wider laces give a more ‘plump’ look. If you have another fabric, weave in two, or three different patterend/textured (think lace trimmings and bobble fringes!) laces into the same shoe for even more full-on effect – Try out the lattice or checkerboard weave if you dare!
  • Cut longer than the original lace so you’ll have extra length to wrap around the ankles a la Alaïa.

Have fun!