Azuma Makoto Atelier, Tokyo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

No cello-tape, I promise

 

 

 

 

 

Distortion x Flowers

 

 

 

Fish and flowers

 

Wearing: Floral blouse, Zara. Balloon skirt, ASOS. Heels, Alexander Wang via Vestiaire Collective. DIY Cropped black jeans, Zara.

Ice cream and fresh flowers – two things that I would not mind living and breathing for the rest of my life. Did I read somewhere OREO’s do ice cream cookie sandwiches? I’m smearing peanut butter on my body right now, somebody run to the cornerstore. (Are they actually available in the UK?) Speaking of flowers, today a gust of wind passed through our window and knocked down a vase that had a slightly unhappy bunch of – quote, unquote – dahlias (these are what actual dahlias look like, if you’re curious), and it just happened to land square on a pile of fresh-laundered clothes. FRESHLY WASHED CLOTHES MAN. For your information, dahlia vase-water (slight past expiry date) smells of bum piss. I can swear like a truck driver, another thing I learned today. I may have not entirely sworn off flowers for now but I’m never buying pissin’ dahlias again, even ones with petals.

Anyhow, this is one of my favourite bits from the recent trip to Tokyo with Perrier-Jouët – visiting the artist & designer Azuma Makoto‘s atelier in Aoyama and having a go at flower arrangement into the wire-frame used in his collaboration with Perrier-Jouët on the new Belle Époque Florale bottle. MAN that was difficult, kind of like hanging fairy-lights on wire railing, really gimmicky fairy-lights with random green stick bits that don’t coil. Also, I had no idea there were this many types of foliage in floristry? I can probably name one… lettuce… but I don’t think that was available there, no. At least the session really allowed me to appreciate his work more – you must check out his blog, his work is otherworldly. I love the fact that he doesn’t just work with ready-grown flowers but likes to get right into the middle of life cycle challenging growth patterns (such beautiful hybrids) and reinventing synergy of plant and environment. One word, genius.